I’ve finished my oncology treatments. What follow-up care should I expect?

There are several factors influencing what follow-up care will be required upon completion of treatment: the type of cancer, its stage, the treatment received, your general state of health, the professional involved and even the hospital and the region of Quebec where the treatment was administered.

After chemotherapy or radiation oncology, it is usually the oncologist who is in charge of follow-up.

If you have had surgery, two weeks after your operation, you will meet with a health professional (surgeon, nurse or family doctor) who will assess your surgical wounds and your general condition. In more complex situations, CLSC nursing care service might be included in your treatment schedule prior to and following your appointment with the surgeon.

You will usually meet with your attending specialist after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Some oncologists will also want to see you annually for a few years or even indefinitely, if appropriate. This assessment should be completed in parallel with a health assessment conducted by your family physician. Moreover, make sure your doctor is informed at every stage of your journey with the illness and has access to a complete copy of your medical record.

The great challenge ... to resume a normal life

Your goal for this post-treatment period will be to gradually resume your activities. It will be very important to adopt or maintain a healthy lifestyle, one that includes a balanced diet, physical activity, relaxation, socialization, etc.

Do you live in Montreal, Quebec, the Eastern Townships, Mauricie and Outaouais regions? Come to the Quebec Cancer Foundation and participate, in our Art Therapy or Kinesiology (adapted physical activity) workshops, free of charge. These activities will do you a lot of good and give you an opportunity to interact with people with similar experiences to your own.

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